Creative Hack #1: Set Completion

Blogpic_4-6-16 Imagine sitting down at your desk one Monday morning and finding an untouched Sunday New York Times crossword puzzle waiting for you. A deadline looms. Although you have no time or intention to muddle through it, you do notice one clue for a 3-letter word: “NFL star Manning.”

But it’s a busy day and you feel no compulsion to attack the puzzle, so you simply smile, set the puzzle aside and move on with your day, without bothering to fill in the easy answer with “Eli.”

Now imagine the same scenario, but this time the entire puzzle has been completed—every answer to every clue —EXCEPT the 3-letter answer for “NFL Star Manning.”

If you feel compelled to pick up a pencil and complete the puzzle in this situation, despite the looming deadline, you have taken a very human action that human behavior scientists refer to as set completion.

“Finishing tasks that are incomplete gives us all a huge sense of satisfaction,” says Dr. Kiki Koutmeridou, Behavioral Science Strategist for DonorVoice. “Framing items as parts of a whole unit elicits a desire for completion and encourages effort and motivation, even in the absence of external rewards.”

Continue reading

The Great Fundraising Mandala

blog_pic_2-3-16_squareThe dynamics of successful direct response fundraising has been described as a three-legged stool: Strategy (analytics) drives Creative (tactics) drives Performance (data), from which Strategy generates analytics. That brings us back to the first leg of the stool.

Remove one leg from the relationship and the stool falls over. Simple.

But there is an inherent weakness in the simplicity of this construct. It leaves out the most integral component, namely the donor. More specific, his or her attitudinal and behavioral fabric.

After all, donors react emotionally and rationally — or not — to the strategically considered, tactically rendered communication sitting before them. That’s the reality behind “Performance,”  and it directly influences the direction of subsequent strategies and tactics.

Perhaps better to visualize the fundraising dynamics as a wheel, or, because of the cyclical, concentric, and interdependent nature of its components, a mandala (to borrow from Eastern philosophies.)

Continue reading

The Creative Equation

homecard5_secondaryEngineers use a term called the angle of repose to describe the steepest slope at which an object remains at rest before gravity takes over and the object begins to fall downhill. Wallace Stegner used this notion in his wonderful novel of the same name to describe the movements of an American family.

Malcolm Gladwell uses the notion of a tipping point in his wonderful book of the same name, to define transformative social phenomena, and describes it as “the moment of critical mass, the threshold, the boiling point…”

Relative to nonprofit direct response marketing, it strikes me that it is the creative strategist’s job to use all the powerful tools in the fundraising toolbox to tease out a donor’s angle of repose or tipping point. Specifically, to understand the moment she decides to take action.  That action could be financial contribution, activism, Continue reading